Federal judge clears way for class action lawsuit against LMDC for keeping inmates in custody too long

A federal judge has now made it easier for some ex-inmates to obtain damages from the Louisville Metro Correctional Facility. It’s a verdict that originally stems from a 2017 lawsuit accusing LMDC of keeping detainees beyond their release dates. The correctional department appealed but was denied in LMDC for more than four hours after the court ordered their release, they can now join forces in a class action lawsuit. In other words, instead of filing separate individual lawsuits against the prison, they can join forces. The same can happen for anyone detained more than 12 hours after being convicted at LMDC from February 3, 2016 to today. “I think it could easily affect five to ten people a year,” said Daniel Johnson, president of Metro Corrections Fraternal of Police. “Especially when you break it down by the hour. I wouldn’t be surprised if there are 10 people a year. ”Johnson has been with LMDC for 17 years. He said booking and releasing inmates has always been a problem for as long as he can remember. “Communication between the courthouse and the files is broken,” said Johnson. “They use different computer systems and so often just send over the actual paperwork. We don’t always get the paperwork, sometimes it gets lost, sometimes the days that are entered are not entered at the other end. “Which, in his opinion, accumulated until 2017, when a group of former inmates filed lawsuits against the prison for being held for too long. One of the plaintiffs claims she was held in prison six days after her charges were dismissed. Another claims he should only have served three days, but ended up serving five. “I’m actually surprised it took so long,” said Johnson. “It doesn’t sound bad numerically, but even one is too many. Until a person was held longer than they should have been held. “Now the case is going back to the district court. Meanwhile, Johnson said he hoped this ruling will change the hands through which it goes,” Johnson said. “We also need to access the same computer system.” An LMDC spokesman declined to comment on the matter and referred WLKY to the Jefferson County Attorney. The prosecutor didn’t answer WLKY’s calls.

A federal judge has now made it easier for some ex-inmates to obtain damages from the Louisville Metro Correctional Facility. It’s a ruling that originally stems from a 2017 lawsuit accusing LMDC of keeping inmates past their discharge dates.

The public order office appealed, but it was rejected.

That said, anyone from February 3, 2016 to date who was incarcerated at LMDC for more than four hours after the court ordered their release can now unite in a class action lawsuit. In other words, instead of filing separate individual lawsuits against the prison, they can join forces.

The same can happen for anyone who has been detained at LMDC for more than 12 hours from February 3, 2016 until today after their actual release.

“I think it could easily affect five to ten people a year,” said Daniel Johnson, police president of Metro Corrections. “Especially when you break it down by the hour. I wouldn’t be surprised if there are 10 people a year. “

Johnson has been with LMDC for 17 years. He said booking and releasing inmates has always been a problem for as long as he can remember.

“Communication between the courthouse and the files is broken,” said Johnson. “They use different computer systems and so often just send over the actual paperwork. We don’t always get the paperwork, sometimes it gets lost, sometimes the days that are entered are not entered at the other end. “

Which, in his opinion, has accumulated by 2017. At that time, a group of former inmates filed complaints against the prison for being in prison for too long. One of the plaintiffs alleges that she was held in prison six days after her charges were dismissed. Another claims he should only have served three days, but ended up serving five.

“I’m really surprised it took so long,” said Johnson. “Numerically it doesn’t sound bad, but even one is too much. Until a person has been held longer than they should have been held.”

Now the case goes back to the regional court.

Meanwhile, Johnson said he hoped this ruling would bring about a change.

“If we can get the same people who work the court records to have the same ones on file just typing them in as they come, it will take away the many hands it goes through,” Johnson said. “We also need to access the same computer system.”

An LMDC spokesman declined to comment on the matter and referred WLKY to the Jefferson County Attorney.

The prosecutor did not answer WLKY’s calls.

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