Clemson track and field team hires attorney, says it will pursue class action lawsuit against Clemson if necessary

Clemson University announced that by the end of the 2020-21 academic year it would eliminate the men’s intercollegiate athletics and cross country teams. Some athletics program members have received legal advice since that announcement. On Friday, Arthur Bryant, attorney at Bailey Glasser LLP, sent a letter to Clemson President Jim Clements that reads below: “Unless Clemson agrees to receive the men’s athletics and cross country teams , or has any plans to comply with Title IX We don’t know yet, we will be filing an injunction to maintain and continue these teams, “Bryant wrote in the letter. WYFF News 4 has requested a comment from Clemson University and has not yet received a response. In February 2021, a civil rights complaint was filed against Clemson University for discontinuing its athletics and cross-country skiing programs for men. The complaint alleges that Clemson University has violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination based on race, color, and national origin in programs and activities that receive federal funding. Athlete and activist Russell Dinkins worked alongside current and past Clemson athletes, alumni, and parents to file the complaint, believing that by cutting the men’s track and field program, Clemson is directly targeting African American athletes on campus and increasing the number of opportunities who have got African American men in it. “Clemson University cuts a sport with a large black student population and black students are over-represented on the track team compared to the other teams on campus,” said Dinkins. “So you have the one team that has neither turnover nor profit, but a high degree of diversity. This is the only sport that is being cut, which is a problem and has a discriminatory effect.” Dinkins’ complaint joins a long list of opposition to the cut in the track team at both local and national levels. Current and past student athletes have created “@SaveClemsonXCTF” social media accounts to attract attention and build support. Senator Marlon of South Carolina Kimpson wrote an open letter to Clemson University President Clements about the recruitment of the men’s athletics and cross-country skiing teams, requesting an investigation into Clemson University’s decision by the South Carolina General Assembly. He wrote in part: “I am concerned about Clemson University’s decision to end the men’s cross-country skiing and athletics program. In my view, based on the current demographics of the program, a cut will have a cross-generational effect on African American men.” and cross-country teams across the country, including the state of Florida, Duke University, and most recently the University of Tennessee men’s track team, have expressed support for Clemson’s athletics and cross-country programs.

Clemson University announced that by the end of the 2020-21 academic year it would eliminate the men’s intercollegiate athletics and cross country teams. Some athletics program members have received legal advice since that announcement. On Friday, Arthur Bryant, attorney at Bailey Glasser LLP, sent a letter to Clemson President Jim Clements that can be read below:

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“Unless Clemson agrees to keep the men’s track and field and cross country teams, or has plans to comply with Title IX that we don’t know about, we will apply for an injunction to maintain and continue these teams,” wrote Bryant in the letter.

WYFF News 4 has requested a comment from Clemson University and has not yet received a response.

In February 2021, a civil rights complaint was filed against Clemson University for discontinuing its athletics and cross-country skiing programs for men. The complaint alleges that Clemson University has violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination based on race, color, and national origin in programs and activities that receive federal funding.

Athlete and activist Russell Dinkins worked with current and former Clemson athletes, alumni, and parents to create the complaint, and believes that by cutting back on the men’s track and field program, Clemson will directly target African American athletes on campus and increase the number of opportunities for African American men aims in receiving.

“Clemson University is a sport that has a large black student population and the black students are over-represented on the track team compared to the other teams on campus,” said Dinkins. “So you have the one team that has neither turnover nor profit, but a high degree of diversity. This is the only sport that is being cut, which is a problem and has a discriminatory effect.”

Dinkins’ complaint joins a long list of opposition to the cut in the track team, both locally and nationally.

Current and former student athletes have created “”@ SaveClemsonXCTF“” Social media accounts to get attention and build support.

South Carolina Senator Marlon Kimpson wrote an open letter to Clemson University President Clements about the recruitment of the men’s track and field and cross country teams, requesting an investigation into Clemson University’s decision by the South Carolina General Assembly .

“I am concerned about Clemson University’s decision to end the men’s cross-country skiing and athletics program. I believe a cut based on the program’s current demographics will have a cross-generational effect on African American men.”

Competing track and field and cross country teams across the country, including Florida State, Duke University and most recently the University of Tennessee track and field team, have expressed their support for Clemson’s track and field and cross country programs.

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