Clemson female athletes threaten Title IX class action lawsuit

Women athletes at Clemson have retained legal counsel and are ready to file a class action lawsuit against the university alleging Title IX discrimination just days after the men’s athletics team filed a separate legal lawsuit against Clemson. A representative attorney A group of female athletes sent a letter to Clemson President Jim Clements Monday saying that if the school stops making plans to provide more financial aid to its female athletes, they intend to file a class action lawsuit. On Friday, Arthur Bryant of Bailey Glasser LLP, the law firm that advises the men’s distance and cross-country teams, sent a letter to Clements threatening to file a class action lawsuit in case the decision to terminate the program was imminent Hit last November, not reversed The sales force is hiring an attorney, saying it will pursue a class action lawsuit if necessary. Lori Bullock, whose company Newkirk Zwagerman represents the female athletes, said her clients include students -athletes from the rowing, cross-country skiing, and athletics programs for women. Title IX law requires universities to be men and women in college -Campus Equal, which means both a fair amount of individual opportunity to compete in the sport as well as financial support for participants “We are sending this letter because the athletes we represent want Clemson to comply with all aspects of Title IX “wrote Bullock. “Our clients are aware of a recent letter on behalf of the men’s cross-country skiing and athletics teams urging Clemson to reinstate the men’s teams in order to bring the university into line with the athletic participation requirements of Title IX. You support them Efforts. And they want Clemson to meet the other requirements of Title IX as well. “Clemson appears to be depriving male student athletes of equal opportunities to participate in Title IX violations and female student athletes of the same athletic financial assistance, treatment and benefits for violating Title IX.” The letter goes on. ” All of this has to stop. “The full letter sent by Bullock to Clements can be read below: According to the latest available public data Clemson submitted to the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act 2019-20, the university had a nearly equal student population breakdown of 50 .01% male students and 49.99% female students. Bullock’s letter on behalf of women states that only 39% of students receive funding for Clemson sports. According to the letter sent by Bryant, a cut in the route would be and cross-country skiing program for men left school with 318 female athletes and only 229 male athletes, which corresponds to a participation gap of 8.14%.

Women athletes at Clemson have retained legal counsel and are ready to file a class action lawsuit against the university alleging Title IX discrimination just days after the men’s athletics team filed a separate legal lawsuit against Clemson.

A lawyer representing a group of female athletes sent a letter to Clemson President Jim Clements Monday saying that if the school stops making plans to provide more financial aid to its female athletes, they intend to file a class action lawsuit.

On Friday, Arthur Bryant of Bailey Glasser LLP, the law firm that advised the men’s track and cross-country teams, sent a letter to Clements threatening to file a class action lawsuit in case the decision to suspend the program was made last November was hit, not fell undone.

RELATED: The Clemson Athletics Team Hires an Attorney and Says they will pursue a class action lawsuit if necessary.

Lori Bullock, whose company Newkirk Zwagerman represents the female athletes, said her clients include student athletes from the women’s rowing, cross-country skiing and athletics programs.

The Title IX law requires universities to treat men and women equally in college, which means both an adequate number of individual opportunities to compete in sports and financial support for participants.

“We are sending this letter because the athletes we represent want Clemson to comply with all aspects of Title IX,” wrote Bullock. “Our clients are aware of a recent letter on behalf of the men’s cross-country skiing and athletics teams urging Clemson to reinstate the men’s teams in order to bring the university into line with the athletic participation requirements of Title IX. You support them Efforts. And they want Clemson to meet the other requirements of Title IX too.

“Clemson appears to be depriving male student athletes of equal opportunities to participate in Title IX violations and female student athletes of the same athletic financial support, treatment and performance that violates Title IX,” the letter said. “All of this has to stop.”

The full letter from Bullock to Clements can be read below:

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MORE BREAKING NEWS: Athletes from @ClemsonUniv athletics, cross-country skiing and rowing have received advice for a possible class action lawsuit against Clemson for violating Title IX for unequal treatment and unequal fin. Help. They are well aware of the men’s action and fully support them. pic.twitter.com/spcHZQJ4MO

– Russell Dinkins (@DancingDinks) March 15, 2021

According to the latest available public data submitted by Clemson under the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act 2019-20, the university had a nearly equal population breakdown of 50.01% male students and 49.99% female students.

Bullock’s letter on behalf of women states that only 39% of financial support for Clemson sports goes to female athletes.

According to the letter sent by Bryant, a cut to the men’s track and cross-country program would drop out of school with 318 female athletes and only 229 male athletes, representing an 8.14% participation gap.

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